Vegetation recovery trends under dual dominance of climate change and anthropogenic factors in the severely damaged areas of the Wenchuan earthquake Vegetation recovery trends under dual dominance of climate change and anthropogenic factors in the severely damaged areas of the Wenchuan earthquake

最小化 最大化

Vol19 No.11: 3131-3147 

Title】Vegetation recovery trends under dual dominance of climate change and anthropogenic factors in the severely damaged areas of the Wenchuan earthquake

Author】WANG Qian1; WANG Ze-gen1*; YONG Zhi-wei1; ZHAO Kai2; XIONG Jun-nan3,4; DU Xue-mei1; Zhao Yang1

Addresses】1 School of Geoscience and Technology, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, China; 2 Applied Geology Research Center of China Geological Survey, Chengdu 610036, China; 3 School of Civil Engineering and Geomatics, Southwest Petroleum University, Chengdu 610500, China; 4 State Key Laboratory of Resources and Environmental Information System, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China

Corresponding author】WANG Ze-gen

Citation】Wang Q, Wang ZG, Yong ZW, et al. (2022) Vegetation recovery trends under dual dominance of climate change and anthropogenic factors in the severely damaged areas of the Wenchuan earthquake. Journal of Mountain Science 19(11). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11629-022-7553-9

DOI】https://doi.org/10.1007/s11629-022-7553-9

Abstract】The occurrence of the Wenchuan earthquake caused the degradation of regional ecosystems, including vegetation destruction.However, the post-seismic vegetation recovery and its driving forces on the spatial-temporal scale are still vague, especially in the severely damaged areas (including Wenchuan, Beichuan, Mianzhu, Shifang, Qingchuan, Maoxian, Anzhou, Dujiangyan, Pingwu and Pengzhou). Here, we detected vegetation recovery in the severely damaged areas by using Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) to analyze the time series characteristics of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), and explored the driving effects of climate, land use types, nighttime light, water system, slope, and clay content on vegetation recovery based on Geographically and Temporally Weighted Regression (GTWR) model. The results indicated that the post-seismic vegetation recovery rate increased rapidly (acceleration > 0) but slowed down after 2013. And the areas of best vegetation recovery (EVI increments > 0.1) were distributed in the north of the study area, the Minjiang River Basin, and front fault and central fault of the Longmenshan Fault Zone. While the areas with the worst vegetation recovery (EVI increments < -0.1) were concentrated in the southern high-altitude areas and the Chengdu Plain. Additionally, a process attribution of the driving forces of vegetation recovery indicated that accumulated precipitation and maximum temperature promoted vegetation recovery (regression coefficients > 0), but the impacts weakened after the earthquake, possibly due to the increase of secondary disasters induced by precipitation and the rise in maximum temperature. The impact of cultivated land on vegetation recovery was mostly positive (regression coefficients > 0), which may be related to the implementation of the Grain for Green Project. The nighttime light inhibited vegetation recovery (regression coefficients < 0), which could be closely associated with urbanization. The results indicated that more attention should be paid to the nonlinear variations of post-earthquake vegetation recovery trends, and the effects of climatic and anthropogenic factors on vegetation recovery also should not be underestimated.

Keywords】Vegetation recovery; Enhanced Vegetation Index; Ensemble empirical mode decomposition; Geographically and Temporally Weighted Regression