Artificial Neural Network-based prediction of glacial debris flows in the ParlungZangbo Basin, southeastern Tibetan Plateau, China Artificial Neural Network-based prediction of glacial debris flows in the ParlungZangbo Basin, southeastern Tibetan Plateau, China

最小化 最大化

Vol18 No.1: 1-20

Title】Field testing innovative differential geospatial and photogrammetric monitoring technologiesin mountainous terrain near Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada

Author】David HUNTLEY1*; Peter BOBROWSKY2#; Roger MACLEOD2; Robert COCKING1; Jamel JOSEPH1; Drew ROTHERAM-CLARKE1

Addresses】1 Geological Survey of Canada, 1500-605 Robson Street, Vancouver, British Columbia,V6B 5J3, Canada; 2 Geological Survey of Canada, 9860 West Saanich Road, Sidney, British Columbia, V8L 4B2, Canada

Corresponding author】David HUNTLEY

Citation】Huntley D, Bobrowsky P, Macleod R, et al. (2021) Field testing innovative differential geospatial and photogrammetric monitoring technologies in mountainous terrain near Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada. Journal of Mountain Science 18(1). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11629-020-6552-y

DOI】https://doi.org/10.1007/s11629-020-6552-y

Abstract】This paper presents a novel approach to continuously monitor very slow-moving translational landslides in mountainous terrain using conventional and experimental differential global navigation satellite system (d-GNSS) technologies. A key research question addressed is whether displacement trends captured by a radio-frequency "mobile"
d-GNSS network compare with the spatial and temporal patterns in activity indicated by satellite interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry. Field testing undertaken at Ripley Landslide, near Ashcroft in south-central British Columbia, Canada, demonstrates the applicability of new geospatial technologies to monitoring ground control points (GCPs) and railway infrastructure on a landslide with small and slow annual displacements (<10 cm/yr). Each technique records increased landslide activity and ground displacement in late winter and early spring. During this interval, river and groundwater levels are at their lowest levels, while ground saturation rapidly increases in response to the thawing of surficial earth materials, and the infiltration of snowmelt and runoff occurs by way of deep-penetrating tension cracks at the head scarp and across the main slide body. Research over the last decade provides vital information for government agencies, national railway companies, and other stakeholders to understand geohazard risk, predict landslide movement, improve the safety, security, and resilience of Canada's transportation infrastructure; and reduce risks to the economy, environment, natural resources, and public safety.

Keywords】Landslide; Change detection monitoring; Global Navigation Satellite System; Real-Time Kinematic System; GeocubeTM; Bathymetric Survey; Unmanned Aerial Vehicle; Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar